Winding Down our Time in Grenada

With the exception of the rolling anchorage at Prickly Bay, we loved everything about Grenada. The small marina provided an amazing variety of boating services, and the owner continues to expand their offerings. Their dinghy dock is quite new and is one of the better docks we encountered. For Joy and me, having the dinghy dock level with the gunwale allows Joy to easily get ashore. When you’re loading a bunch of gear and groceries, it’s easier for everyone, not just us.
We met some wonderful people in Grenada and made new cruising friends as well. Peter and Lynn from South Africa had some amazing stories to tell about how they met, where they’d sailed, and how they came to arrive in the Caribbean. They lead a lifestyle similar to ours, part of the year on the yacht and part back home, a great life. We will surely visit Grenada again.

Prickly Bay Marina Dinghy Dock
Prickly Bay Marina Dinghy Dock

 The morning VHF cruiser’s net is easily heard in Prickly Bay, and it offers a wealth of information for the visiting yachtsman. They announce security issues, community events, restaurant deals, and boating items for barter or sale; on this last point we benefited. We began preparing Ocean Angel for the offshore trip from Grenada to Trinidad, and our last task is to stow the outboard on the stern bracket, the dinghy on deck. As I moved the motor onto the bracket, a piece of the bracket snapped, and we were left with having to jury rig a repair. Joy remembered the name of a boat who just that morning had offered a used Edson mounting bracket at an incredible price. Not needing it at 8 AM, I’d ignored the offer, but by 3 PM, however, it was a different story! Sure enough, the man still had the bracket, and we were able to purchase a $300 sturdy mount for $50. What a deal, and perfect timing.
Looking beyond Ocean Angel to the Eastern Shoreline
Looking beyond Ocean Angel to the Eastern Shoreline

As the sun set over the western shore we reviewed our plans for departure. To be certain of a daylight arrival, we needed to leave Prickly Bay in the dark. We took note of the position and characteristics of all the boats around us, what lights they displayed, how they looked in the dark, and set our alarm for 02:00.
Sunset over Prickly Bay
Sunset over Prickly Bay

When we arose, it was pitch black. Lights from on shore didn’t illuminate the bay at all, and we had to rely on our earlier observations. To make matters more difficult, a light dew covered the dodger glass limiting visibility. Though it was a bit unnerving for a few minutes, once the anchor was up and we cleared the first boat, all else went as planned and we slid out of the anchorage uneventfully. With nearly 100 miles to go before we were safely anchored, it was time to make tracks. 

Rock on South to Trinidad