Weaving Back Home

What we sorely needed after leaving Depaz was a nap, not a long drive back to our Angel. But since we had to do it, we chose to wind up over the central mountain range past Mt. Peleé, then down to the eastern shore where we drove the twisting, coastal route back to Marin. Along the way we saw a few more enticing places to visit on our next road trip. 

Fort de France and the Big Harbor
Fort de France and the Big Harbor

Driving around the island was anything but boring. We’d rented a small Nissan hatchback, 5-speed sportster, and driving that peppy car brought back memories of sports cars we’d owned years ago when we lived in New England. At one point I entered a sharp turn a little too fast, and the car slid and drifted through the turn without a whole lot of fuss. Kind of brought a smile to our faces!
The sun was just setting over the harbor as we climbed into the dinghy for the short ride back to the boat. We’d had a very full day.

Daily Dinghy Races and Sailing Schools
Daily Dinghy Races and Sailing Schools

Each day after school lots of kids take to small boats at the local sailing school for instruction and short races. Optis, Lasers, and other dinghy racers tack in and around anchored boats all across the harbor, and it’s always fun to while away part of an afternoon watching the kids have fun. A few capsizes occur, some planned, others not, but the kids are back up sailing in no time. 
We were anchored not far from the Chrysler 21 foot sailboat in the photo above. Believe it or not, this little boat is home to a single young man who rarely leaves his boat. Another cruiser told us he’d sailed it from Puerto Rico south to Venezuela, then east to Martinique which he now calls home. He apparently has no cooking facilities, no running water, no head, and no headroom either. We’re not quite sure how or if he maintains his sanity. Could you?

Ocean Angel, our Home in Cul de Sac Marin
Ocean Angel, our Home in Cul de Sac Marin

People often ask how we can stand to be “cooped up in a tiny sailboat” for weeks on end. We tell them the world is our home. Onboard we have absolutely everything we need and more – a freezer with a six months supply of meats, a refrigerator with fresh foods and cold beer, a gas range with oven, hot and cold running water endlessly supplied, fresh bread daily, French wines at $5.00 a bottle, Egyptian linens on our bed. We have our snacks, dark chocolate, and each other; we could keep going, but what more could we want? Plus, if we don’t like our neighbors, we move. Bet you can’t do that.
After a few days carrying out routine projects and maintenance, doing laundry, cleaning, and so on, we rented a car with cruising friends Gary and Patti, and planned a couple days just wandering wherever the roads lead us. Our only goal was to find out of the way towns and places. 

Wander into the Interior
or
Sail on Home