Setting the Anchor in Prickly Bay

Since daylight was rapidly fading, we decided to anchor for the night just to the south of St. George’s harbor where we’d noticed quite a few boats anchored. The anchorage there is a wide open roadstead, but it is protected from all prevailing trade winds. Both our charts and guides indicated the holding was poor in this location, but with nothing behind us all the way to Central America, I thought we’d probably be OK no matter happened. Getting the anchor to hold at all was another story; on our first try, when the anchor appeared to be holding I had Joy apply idle speed in reverse, and immediately I heard the anchor grating across the bottom. When I retrieved the Rocna, I found the tip of the anchor polished smooth and shiny by the hard coral bottom. We managed to find a sandy spot, though, and finally got the anchor to hold at least for the one night.

Looking Out Over Prickly Bay Anchorage
Looking Out Over Prickly Bay Anchorage
 
Early the next morning we motor sailed south around the corner to enter Prickly Bay, an anchorage reported to be rolly and often very uncomfortable, nevertheless, popular with cruisers. Customs and Immigration are located at the marina on this bay, and that feature would make for an easier departure when it came time to leave. We motored around the anchorage for quite a while before we selected a spot that seemed to be somewhat calmer, but after a few days, we realized there are very few calm spots in this anchorage. Only up in the furthest reaches of the bay is the water really calm, and guess what, there’s not a breath of air up in that corner. 
Ocean Angel Rolling in Prickly Bay
Ocean Angel Rolling in Prickly Bay

We anchored near the Prickly Bay Marina, former home of Spice Island Marine and I soon became friendly with the owner. Even though we chose not to stay at his marina (it was rolly also), we made use of several services there, the restaurant, laundry, grocery, fuel dock, and trash collection. PricklyMarina-_068
As we find so frequently in foreign countries, once he discovered Joy’s lack of mobility, he and the staff went out their way to help us whenever possible. He wanted to make sure the dinghy dock met our needs, that Joy could access the docks easily, and that we were enjoying ourselves in Grenada. We couldn’t ask for more.

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