Puerto Morelos on the Yucatan Coast

Once again we were holed up in a safe harbor waiting for the unfavorable winds to vent their frustration at not being able to beat us to a pulp. Ocean Angel was snug as a bug in a rug while moored to the floating docks at Marina El Cid, but outside the breakwater, winds howling at 30 plus knots turned the harbor into a maelstrom. We took most of the next day to explore the town of Puerto Morelos. When I asked the dock master if he could call a taxi for us to go downtown, he said “No need for that. Let me go get the van and I’ll drive you downtown. Now, when do you want to return?” What service.

The Old Lighthouse at Puerto Morelos
The Old Lighthouse at Puerto Morelos

 Centrally located between Cancun, Cozumel, and Playa del Carmen, Puerto Morelos is a bustling town offering a wide range of services and supplies to boaters and land dwellers alike. The waterfront section is somewhat of a tourist trap consisting mostly of stores, shops, and more stores. There is a bakery (it was closed), several jewelry hawkers, some restaurants, and plenty of touristy traps, the same kinds you see in any tourist town. Joy and I did our best to get away from that area as quickly as possible. We wandered to the waterfront to gaze at the old hurricane damaged lighthouse, watch the fishermen, and watch the tacky tourists. Earlier in the year on our way south we had anchored just off this town pier, and looking at the anchorage from shore offered a different perspective. No wonder all the kids rowed out to see us when we were at anchor. Other than the fishing boats and the big commercial boats at the port, we had offered the only entertainment. We liked Puerto Morelos, but unless you needed supplies or provisions, it really didn’t have much to offer. One day was enough, and we chose to simply relax at the resort until we got a break in the weather. 

Marina El Cid
Marina El Cid

Not that relaxing at El Cid was all that bad! You would never know from looking at the photo that a full gale was blowing outside. The massive breakwaters you see in the distance stop anything from entering the marina, even the vicious winds. All we felt was a nice breeze cooling the air. Access to every part of the property was exceptionally easy, and every staff member was always ready to help in any way possible. 

Huge Breakwater
Huge Breakwater

I never got right up close to the breakwaters with my camera, but I should have, just to show the enormous size of their wall. The photo below gives you some idea though, as the breakwater is about 600 feet behind our boat. The designers of Marina El Cid Cancun left nothing to chance when it came to anticipating what a hurricane might do to the facility. There are no worries here as that wall is about 40 feet tall and 40 feet or more across. Each of those massive stones is about as big as half of our boat. So first any storm surge has to roar across the offshore reefs, than travel another couple of miles, break on another reef or two, and finally reach The Wall. My guess is, they’re safe.

Dinner at El Cid
Dinner at El Cid
Me Too!
Me Too!

That evening we decided to have dinner at the waterfront restaurant adjacent to the marina. Service par excellence was the order of the day with several waiters working our table jumping at the chance to fill our water glasses, bring us more bread, and make sure the food was perfect. Absolutely nothing was left undone. Both Joy and I loved this beautiful place. HH-Arcangel

Cruise north to Isla Mujeres