Nanny Cay – Our Home

What would our final day at anchor in the BVI be without at least a glimpse of The Last Resort? We decided to hop over to Trellis Bay despite the crowd where we could either anchor or take a mooring if it was too crowded. On the short hop over to Trellis Bay we briefly headed into the wind to unfurl the jib and drop it on deck so that I could clean it, then bag it for the season. Good thing too, because I discovered a 6 inch tear in the luff tape at the head of the sail, and I’m sure the sail would have come apart had we tried to use the sail in any wind at all.

The Last Resort
The Last Resort

Well, guess what; a mooring it was! We weren’t really surprised as the bay is jammed with moorings. We chose a mooring in shallow water, only 10 feet deep, tucked in close to the shore because with the wind howling at 25 knots, floating in nice flat water seemed like a good idea for our last night. 
Sail Serendipity
Sail Serendipity

In just about every place we anchored we saw this beautifully maintained Beneteau 50 named Serendipity. After a few times we realized the boat was a captained charter boat, and the young lady captain was extremely busy every day with one charter after another. We noticed one of her charters that was particularly meaningful to us. Day after day while we were anchored at Marina Cay, she would take the dinghy in to a dock behind us on Camanoe Island where friends would help an older gentleman in a wheel chair board the dinghy, go to the yacht, then head out for a day-sail to wherever and back. That’s a special captain. We never got to meet her, but we think she deserves mention.

We took it easy for most of the day. We knew that once docked at Nanny Cay to begin storage preparations in earnest, there would be nothing but work. And the next morning, after a quick sail under main alone down the Sir Francis to Nanny Cay, hurricane season preparations took on new meaning. The lists were seemingly endless, and we both worked from dawn to dusk for two days straight putting the boat into a condition where we felt comfortable leaving her right in the heart of the hurricane belt. Ocean Angel is stripped bare with not a line left on deck, halyards hauled to the masthead, all canvas and running rigging removed, solar panels, wind generator, and all the mounting hardware stripped. A bare hull exposed to the weather, strapped down to heavy anchors secured six feet into the earth below. And fingers crossed.

Sailing Sir Francis Drake Channel
Sailing Sir Francis Drake Channel

After the boat was all put away and we were situated in a hotel room for our last day, we decided to have dinner for our last night in the islands at Peg Legs, the Nanny Cay restaurant overlooking the marina on one side, and the Sir Francis Drake channel with the islands beyond on the other. We were celebrating a fantastic journey and forty-one years of a fantastic marriage. Could anything be better?
With very mixed emotions we climbed into a taxi the next morning heading to the Roadtown Fast Ferry, which would take us to St. Thomas to fly home. As the taxi drove us past Ocean Angel, I realized I forgot to take any pictures of Nanny Cay. I guess we were so busy that we never gave it a thought. Learn more about the marina by visiting their website. 

We promise to take those photos when we go back in 2012, but for now folks, like us

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