Marina Cay – British Virgin Islands

This photo just about says it all; what an incredible place to be. I think one of our favorite hideaways will always be tiny Marina Cay. The anchorage is well protected in any weather. Surrounding islands break the wind, and a fringing reef extending north and south of the island providing good protection from wave action. Local boats with better knowledge tucked right in close to the reef anchoring in flat calm water yet cooled by the ever present trade winds . We needed a second day to enjoy it all. 

Marina Cay in the BVI
Marina Cay in the BVI

 Shortly after noon we hopped in the dinghy and headed towards shore for lunch and a little time to stretch our legs. One more time the new Caribe RIB proved its worth; the bow sits much higher than our old Achilles’ bow, and Joy was able to slide off the dinghy onto the dock and easily climb onto her scooter. Every time we use this dinghy we like it more
As soon as you step ashore you feel transported into another place and time. It is so relaxing here with the wind gently sighing through the trees and wafting out over the aquamarine water a stone’s throw away. The whole scene takes your breath away. Whew.
You can't lose your way
You can’t lose your way

We wandered up the tiny brick and gravel walkways heading for lunch at the restaurant around the corner from the fuel dock. Most of the lunch rush was over, and we were able to relax, take our time, and stay as long as we wanted. We knew we wouldn’t get too lost as there were signs pointing the way.
Looking out at Sir Francis Drake Channel
Looking out at Sir Francis Drake Channel

Seated at the main restaurant we looked south towards the anchorage at Trellis Bay, west towards Jost van Dyke, and off to the east we watched boats plying their way north or south out in the Sir Francis Drake channel.
Marina Cay Restaurant
Marina Cay Restaurant

One thing we really enjoy about the islands is the constant sailboat traffic. Boats of all sizes and shapes sail across the waters in every possible state and condition. Most of the charter boats nowadays seem to be more than ready to drop the sails at the least hint of too much wind, wind from the wrong direction, or what we see here all the time, gusty, changing conditions. They motor more than sail, and we thought that strange, but then again, perhaps not so surprising. Cruisers like us however, sail whenever possible.  

On to Virgin Gorda and North Sound