Georgetown

Georgetown is an interesting place; you either love it or you almost hate it. We fell into the latter category, perhaps because we arrived with great expectations of this cruising Mecca. We expected to find a community of globe trotting sailors who would be open to meeting new friends, willing to talk about their experiences, and well, frankly, the types of folks we met when we down in Belize and Guatemala. What we found instead was mostly a community of short term cruisers who seemed to thrive on planned community living. One day was bridge; another was poker; another was bingo or yoga; always something you just had to be doing. Well, we missed it all. In fairness, we certainly did meet a few adventurous folks, one family from France, another from Germany, another from Great Britain, and we spoke to one or two permanent live aboard sailors from the good ole USA, including Clay and Rita Kay, formerly from Regatta Point Marina, Palmetto, our home town. The others came to Georgetown every single year for the planned lifestyle; not our kind of place. 

Lots of Different Neighbors
Lots of Different Neighbors

But, we still made the best of our time in G Town. There really is something for just about everybody, and something is going on all the time, like the sea plane arriving above, most likely disgorging passengers for one of the many mega yachts anchored in the harbor. At one time we had six of them anchored near us, with the crew and guests zipping about on their jet skis, tearing up the harbor in their 30 foot tenders with triple outboards, or occasionally relaxing on the aft sun decks. It was always entertaining, and once in awhile laughable. One yacht, who shall remain nameless for the captain’s sake, about 130 feet long, managed to run hard aground on the approach to the marina downtown. I saw her heading in and commented to Joy, just before she came to a stop, saying “What in the world is the captain doing over there? Doesn’t he have the harbor chart?” Probably not; you know, all the rich folks are glued to their chart plotters.  I’ve cautioned you all about that before.

Busy Anchorage
Busy Anchorage

Early in our stay we discovered that if we chose to remain long enough, we would be in town for the 2010 Family Island Regatta, the National Sport of the Bahamas. Ready for a break from all the traveling, we decided to stay, and I’d have to say that if you find yourself in Georgetown at the right time, this event is one you should attend, at least once. Many cruisers participate year after year, and the entire event, the racing, the parties, the music, and the celebrations are not to be missed. Not long after we arrived, a big trawler pulled up alongside towing four racing sloops alongside and behind them. They anchored and set up camp just upwind from us. The trawler “Amazing Grace” was headquarters for the Staniel Cay racing team of sloops. The days ahead would provide us a front row seat for the exciting race preparations and practices. 

Amazing Grace on the left; 84' Sea Hawk with the dark blue hull, and the racing sloops
Amazing Grace on the left; 84′ Sea Hawk with the dark blue hull, and the racing sloops

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