Departing St. Lucia and Bound for Bequia

We sailed south in weather much like we’d experienced over the past days, rain, heavy rain, then more rain just for a change. At times we relied solely on the radar, depth sounder. and electronic charts to tell us where we were. Fortunately, winds were very light, and we didn’t have to contend with big waves and wind along with the inclement weather. We motor-sailed quietly southwards planning to stop at the Pitons for the night where we would take a mooring close in to shore and hope for smooth conditions. We’d been told we would have to pay a hefty parks fee here, but the ranger who came to the boat simply collected the mooring fee, chatted for a bit, and left us to enjoy the afternoon and evening under the – oops, I started to say stars, but cloudy skies were the rule.

Cruising South  from Rodney Bay
Cruising South from Rodney Bay

One of the local boat boys helped us to a mooring, for a fee, close in under the towering volcanic piton. Currents swirled around us turning the boat gently every which way. Anchoring would have been nigh impossible; even though we were only 100 feet or so from shore, water depth was 60 to 75 feet depending on where we lay. Our boat boy asked if we needed ice, or fish, or eggs, or – anything please. So, I asked for a couple bags of block ice. He came back with 50 pounds. After paying his exorbitant fee, we managed to find room for all the blocks between the freezer, the frig, and our big ice bag. Later at night the skies did actually clear for a bit, and we were treated to an extraordinary night. We were so close to this towering rock wall that we could hear the night time animals chattering and scurrying through the woods.  
Gros Piton at 2619 feet tall
Gros Piton at 2619 feet tall

Early the next morning we dropped the mooring, once again choosing to depart early in order to shave hours off the end of our trip. Our sail would take us down the west coast of St. Vincent and on to Bequia (pronounced beckway). Several cruisers told us to bypass mainland St. Vincent for the time being as incidences of violence against cruisers is at an all time high. Bequia, while part of St. Vincent and the Grenadines, is reported to be quite safe. As we pulled away from the sough coast of St Lucia, we looked back and were treated to an awesome display.
What a View
What a View

Although it appears as if the volcano is erupting, the magnificent peaks are simply grabbing the clouds as they pass, then tossing them off in a brilliant display of color.

Sail South to Bequia