Bashing on to Marina Cay

Leaving Buck Island to port we hugged Tortola’s north shore and worked our way northwest planning to spend the day at either Trellis Bay or Marina Cay. When we reached the entrance to Trellis Bay we peered south towards the mooring area and saw a minefield of anchored and moored vessels. Our choice was simple, but finding a spot to drop anchor at Marina Cay was not, as once again moorings cluttered the shallower good water close to the island. We wandered around a bit before choosing a spot just beyond the outermost row of moorings where we felt safe to anchor. Before the day was over, every available mooring was taken, yet boats kept arriving late into the evening. The unfortunate late comers had no choice but to anchor in some pretty undesirable locations exposed to both wind and waves. We were very happy we arrived early in the day when there were at least a few decent places to set the hook.

Mansion high up on Buck Island
Mansion high up on Buck Island

The photo below shows the southern end of the anchorage at Marina Cay with Trellis Bay in distance. The opening between Trellis Bay and our location is open to the southeast, and even though the photo appears to show smooth water, the reality was anything but. 
Moorings at Marina Cay
Moorings at Marina Cay

Marina Cay is a tiny little island that is home to a resort, restaurant, and a Pusser’s Rum store and boutique. It also happens to have one of the most convenient, easy to access, deep-water fuel docks in the entire BVI, and as result, boats come and go all day long. I was lucky to catch this rare moment below when no one was at the dock. 

Marina Cay Fuel Dock and Pusser's Store
Marina Cay Fuel Dock and Pusser’s Store

After taking my usual reconnoitering run in the dinghy, we decided to go ashore the next day for lunch at the restaurant and an obligatory trip to the Pusser’s Rum store. For those of you who don’t know, Pusser’s Rum was the official rum of the British Royal Navy, and its formula was closely guarded for centuries. British sailors were served a daily portion, or “tot” of rum on every naval vessel from 1655 to 1970 when the tradition was abolished. The formula for the rum was purchased by Charles Tobias in 1979, and he moved the manufacturing to Tortola, BVI. In 1980, he began selling this rum to the public for the first time in history. You can read much more of the interesting history of this high quality rum on the Pusser’s Rum website.
Snorkeling Spot near the Cut
Snorkeling Spot near the Cut

With most of the afternoon to do not much of anything, Joy urged me to take the dinghy to go snorkeling at a spot not far from where we were anchored. I think she wanted to read and nap a bit without me pestering her. Off I went, but I struggled to get the dinghy motor running before I left. There was a row of dinghy moorings just inside the pass to the sea that allowed me to quickly secure the painter and jump into the water to explore the reef wall just off the northeast corner of Camanoe Island. Just to the east of the pass lies Scrub Island Resort, a flashy marina resort catering to the rich and famous, in other words, a place with loud obnoxious parties stretching late in to the night. 

Step Ashore at Marina Cay